Pro Natalist Population PoliciesThis is a featured page

Notecard 1:
Title: Pro-natalist Population Policies
  • Syllabus is under the Main Card - "Population Policies and Projects": Demonstrate an understanding of the UN population projections, the basis on which such projections are calculated and the reasons for undertaking them. Use case studies to describe, explain and attempt to evaluate pro- and anti-natalist population programmes.
  • Definition of Pro-Natalist Policies: The policy of a government to increase population growth by attempting to raise the number of births.

Notecard 2:
Title: Case Studies - Sweden, Poland, France
Sweden Birth rate: 1.74
  • 18 months leave
  • public day care is heavily subsidised
  • flexible work schedules
  • women with children of pre-school age are entitled to reduce their working hours
  • women's participation in the work force is high
Poland Birth rate: 1.75
  • parliament has allowed pay for women for each new child they have
  • every woman will receive a one-off payment of 258 euros (£177) per child
  • women from poorer families will receive double that amount
France Birth rate: 1.90
  • 16 weeks paid maternity leave for the first child, rising to 26 weeks for the third child
  • 26 months parental leave.
  • government gives more money to families with three children
  • child care facilities are subsidised by the government
  • younger children are entitled to full-day childcare (crèches).
  • pre-school programmes

Notecard 3:
Title: Pro-natalist Policy Evaluation
  • Promotes increase of children, which should not be a reason to get good incentives
  • Promotes overpopulation of the world
  • Does not take into consideration the increasing population of other countries
  • May be used only to maintain the race within a country - racisim (eg.UK)
  • Cannot be applied to LEDCs due to the overpopulation that they are already experiencing
  • Identifies good governmental action and implementation

    -----------------------------------------------------

    'pro natalist policy' :
    The policy of a government to increase population growth by attempting to raise the number of births.

    - Birth bonuses, both cash and goods
    - Lower tax rates with increasing numbers of children
    - Favored treatment for housing and welfare benefits

    Pro Natalist Population Policies - IB Geo Class of 2010


    Case studies:
    Birth rates in the European Union are falling fast. An increasing number of women in their 30s are rejecting the job description that they believe comes with parenting - loss of freedom, reduced career prospects and financial burdens.

    Pro Natalist Population Policies - IB Geo Class of 2010

    The governments around Europe are tackling low birth rates with policies designed to make balancing work and parenthood easier;

    Pro Natalist Population Policies - IB Geo Class of 2010

    Pro Natalist Population Policies - IB Geo Class of 2010

    France:
    Birth rate per woman: 1.9
    Mothers can take 16 weeks paid maternity leave for the first child, rising to 26 weeks for the third child. There is also a total of 26 months parental leave. The government pledged more money for families with three children in an effort to encourage working women to have more babies. Child care facilities are subsidised by the government. Younger children are entitled to full-day childcare (crèches). For children aged two to three there are pre-school programmes for which families pay on a sliding scale.

    http://www.slideshare.net/HNurton/france-99335
    (this is a link to a power point presentation that shows the France's pro natalist population policy, as well as their success and failures using the policy.)

    Pro Natalist Population Policies - IB Geo Class of 2010 Pro Natalist Population Policies - IB Geo Class of 2010

    Spain:
    Birth rate per woman: 1.32
    Spanish PM Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero has been urging companies to set up child care facilities and promoting long-term employment over short-term contracts.
    Fully funded maternity leave can last for 16 weeks, and unpaid leave of three years is available, but only about one-third of Spanish mothers take up maternity benefits. Child care services vary from region to region, with some being shorter than the working day.

    Italy:
    Birth rate per woman: 1.33
    The Italian government offers a one-time payment of 1,000 euros (£685) to couples who have a second child.
    A proposal that mooted paying women not to have abortions gained popular support in Parliament.

    Germany:
    Pro Natalist Population Policies - IB Geo Class of 2010
    Birth rate per woman: 1.37
    The government offers 14 weeks maternity leave plus parental leave of up to 36 months, with the level of pay depending on a number of factors. In January, it adopted a bill to give tax breaks to families. It has also floated the idea of eliminating fees for kindergarten.

    UK:
    Pro Natalist Population Policies - IB Geo Class of 2010
    Birth rate per woman: 1.74
    New mothers currently get six months' paid leave and the option of six months further unpaid leave. The first six weeks are at 90% of pay and the next 20 at £102.80 per week. New fathers are allowed two weeks' paid leave at a maximum £102.80 a week. The government offers free early education places. Children from the age of four get free part-time places at nurseries
    Parents of children under the age of six have the right to ask their employers for more flexible working hours. Although employers don't have to agree with the request, they have to show they have considered it carefully.

    Sweden:
    Birth rate per woman: 1.75
    Each parent is entitled to 18 months leave, which is paid for by the government. Public day care is heavily subsidised and flexible work schedules are common - women with children of pre-school age are entitled to reduce their working hours. Women's participation in the work force is high

    Poland:
    Birth rate per woman: 1.78
    The Polish parliament has passed legislation to pay women for each new child they have, in an effort to boost the country's falling population. Under the scheme every woman will receive a one-off payment of 1,000 zlotys (258 euros; £177) - for each child she has. Women from poorer families will receive double that amount.

    Norway:
    Birth rate per woman: 1.81
    Mothers are entitled to 12 months off work with 80% pay or 10 months with full pay. Fathers are entitled to take almost all of that leave instead of the mother. Fathers must take at least four weeks leave or else those weeks will be lost for both parents. The leave is financed through taxes, so employers don't lose out.

    Ireland:
    Birth rate per woman: 1.99
    Mothers get 26 weeks maternity leave plus 14 weeks parental leave

    Russia:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/6990802.stm
    this is an article that talks about how Russia gives prizes to the family who have babies in the Russia's national day.
    "The governor of Ulyanovsk region in Russia is offering prizes to couples who have babies in exactly nine months - on Russia's national day on 12 June. Sergei Morozov wants couples to take the day off work to have sex. If a baby is born on national day, they will receive cars, TVs or other prizes."


    KriziaC
    KriziaC
    Latest page update: made by KriziaC , Apr 8 2010, 9:16 PM EDT (about this update About This Update KriziaC Edited by KriziaC

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